How to Save this Beer?

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    • #1852
      tettnang tom
      Participant
      @tettnang-tom

      I would like to generate some discussion on this question: When do you know it is time to pour out (dump:blink: ) your beer?

      Please give your tips and advice to new members from your experiences. For instance, does time help? Where do you determine that your beer is bad- in the primary?, secondary? corney? bottles? Have you blended a questionable batch with a newer one? Can you offer any more from your brewing experiences?

      For me, dumping beer is a very sad day!

      Please join in this discussion to help newer members know when that sad :S time has arrived to finally POUR OUT your effort of time, money, and sweat!

      tt :-flu :ds

    • #6213
      Anonymous

      I’ve had two experiences with potential ‘dumpers’. The first is a california common I made in May. I’ll spare you the long story, but I had to repitch the yeast, as the first pitch wasn’t strong enough. Therefore, an infection took hold isntead of the yeast when I first put it in primary and had about 60 hours to screw up the beer before the second pitch. I followed through and bottled it. At first tasting I thought maybe there was an overabundance of yeast, but as many of you tasted, it was quite infected. I have still been drinking them, however, despite the sharp bitterness. It was a 5 gallon batch, and I have less than 20 bottles left. I plan on drinking them all, mostly for spite.

      Instance #2. About three months ago I made a winter warmer. Due to a vigorous fermentation and a plugged airlock, the lid was open a crack for about three days during fermentation. When it was time to bottle, it smelled goofy and unusual. I bottled it anyway even though I suspected it was infected. Turns out, it wasn’t infected, or at least not bad at all and the beer is really good now.

      In my opinion, all beer, unless filtered which no one does, has some levels of potentially harmful bacteria no matter how careful you were. The key is to keep these levels very low by not introducing a large blast of bacteria (i.e. using your mouth to start a siphon) and to keep yeast in charge of the brew by giving them a good head start as necessary. That means rehydrating dry yeast or creating a starter for liquid yeast in batches over 1.060.

      Moral of the story is, it is unlikely you have an infection assuming you put some form of yeast in the beer. Also, in my opinion, you never need to dump beer due to an ingredient malfunction. Like, you used crystal 120 instead of crystal 40. Oh no! I tried my hand at making a recipe on my 4th batch. The recipe was crap but Andy was too nice too tell me. It didn’t follow style guidelines at all, closest would be a brown ale. It actually turned out to be really decent beer. Sadie’s friend in Wisconsin found one in her fridge while she was moving out. It had been in there for 9 months. She said it was excellent.

    • #6240
      Jim MolerJim Moler
      Moderator
      @jimjart

      with Botles I would say if the small dimple in the center of the cap is raised it’t bad.
      sorta like when the cans in Grandma’s pantry swell and bloat.:blink: note to self. store in a much cooler place
      than in a closet near the water heater.:woohoo:
      if a Keg is under Co2 I see no reason a Year would be okay. SS inparts no off flavor. you would loose a bit of the Hops due to age. and perhaps a bit of Flavor loss.

    • #6266
      Anonymous

      Jim Moler wrote:

      if a Keg is under Co2 I see no reason a Year would be okay. SS inparts no off flavor. you would loose a bit of the Hops due to age. and perhaps a bit of Flavor loss.

      Your telling me aging in a keg loses flavor? I do not believe. If anything shouldn’t aging in a keg benefit the overall flavor and you turn out with a better beer? As long as theres no air leaks in a keg shouldn’t it age like every other bottled brew?

    • #6267
      tettnang tom
      Participant
      @tettnang-tom

      Mike Lutin wrote:

      Jim Moler wrote:

      if a Keg is under CO2 I see no reason a Year would be okay. SS inparts no off flavor. you would loose a bit of the Hops due to age. and perhaps a bit of Flavor loss.

      Your telling me aging in a keg loses flavor? I do not believe. If anything shouldn’t aging in a keg benefit the overall flavor and you turn out with a better beer? As long as theres no air leaks in a keg shouldn’t it age like every other bottled brew?

      Probably two different issues here. When I age in a corney, I try to fill it as full as possible. Then attach the Co2 and hit it for a few seconds, burp it by pulling the relief valve, then hit it again. This puts a layer of CO2 on top of your beer, while purging the small amount of O2 that was above your beer. A little CO2 burst will properly seat the O-ring of the lid. Then just let your beer condition. Do not carbonate, your beer is just “still.”

      Serving after carbonation from a corney is a different issue. I had an American Brown Ale that tasted great. I had about a gallon left in the corney that was probably about 7 months old. When sampling recently,I definitely could tell a drop in taste. It just didn’t taste like the first pours. Beer changes flavor over time, even with no leaks in your corney. Beer only lasts so long. So the words of advice are: Be patient while waiting for your beer to condition so it will taste great, and don’t linger too long when finishing up your last last few glasses. Club members have even noticed this situation at Fiddler’s. Nothing better than a freshly tapped keg. Pours from commercial kegs that have been around for awhile just are not “fresh or bright tasting.” 😉

      tt

    • #1853
      Jeff WilhelmJeff Wilhelm
      Participant
      @jeffw

      I, too, would say give it some time. This is based on personal experience. I had a pale ale that I wanted to experiment with oaking. After kegging the beer after 1 week on oak, it was so damn harsh it made me gag. Thoughout the next month, I kept testing and seriously thought about dumping it. I left it alone, and after 3 months, the harshness faded. And, after 4 months or so, it finally emerged as a really good beer. This one went from a candidate for dumping to one my better beers.

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