Whirlpooling

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Ross Filipek 2 years, 3 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #532

    Jeff Wilhelm
    Participant

    I am considering using whirlpooling to help reduce the sediment/proteins from entering my fermenter.

    I use a coil chiller in the last 15 minutes of the boil to sanitize it. I am thinking it may be difficult to get a whirlpool with a chiller in the pot.

    Who has whirlpooled and uses a coil chiller?

    Thoughts/suggesions?

  • #11517

    Eddie Hoskin
    Participant

    Most everyone I’ve seen with a pump and a coil chiller effectively “wirlpools” the chiller in order to increase cooling efficiency. As long as your chiller isn’t very tightly wound, which it shouldn’t be for optimum efficiency, then I don’t think it will impede your whirlpooling. In fact, I believe it may actually assist by providing a low-flow zone for sediment to settle down in.

    But really, just try it once and see how it goes! :p

  • #531

    Jeff Wilhelm
    Participant

    I did find this article from AHA about whirlpooling…

    Whirlpooling Makes a World of Difference

  • #24179

    Ross Filipek
    Participant

    My coil chiller has a whirlpool arm that I run with a pump. I’ve had really good results with putting the chiller inside a five-gallon paint strainer bag, and then putting the whole thing into the kettle. The bags from Home Depot have just the right mesh for this (I’ve found others to be too fine).

     

    With this setup, the pickup tube at the bottom of the kettle resides outside of the bag, but the egress tube on the whirlpool arm resides inside the bag. This allows me to capture all of the trub inside the bag during the whirlpool, so none of that material is transferred through to the fermenter.

     

    Really I was just looking for a way to use big late-hop additions without clogging the pump, and this worked well because the chiller doubles as a hop stand.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #532

    Jeff Wilhelm
    Participant

    I am considering using whirlpooling to help reduce the sediment/proteins from entering my fermenter.

    I use a coil chiller in the last 15 minutes of the boil to sanitize it. I am thinking it may be difficult to get a whirlpool with a chiller in the pot.

    Who has whirlpooled and uses a coil chiller?

    Thoughts/suggesions?

  • #11517

    Eddie Hoskin
    Participant

    Most everyone I’ve seen with a pump and a coil chiller effectively “wirlpools” the chiller in order to increase cooling efficiency. As long as your chiller isn’t very tightly wound, which it shouldn’t be for optimum efficiency, then I don’t think it will impede your whirlpooling. In fact, I believe it may actually assist by providing a low-flow zone for sediment to settle down in.

    But really, just try it once and see how it goes! :p

  • #531

    Jeff Wilhelm
    Participant

    I did find this article from AHA about whirlpooling…

    Whirlpooling Makes a World of Difference

  • #24179

    Ross Filipek
    Participant

    My coil chiller has a whirlpool arm that I run with a pump. I’ve had really good results with putting the chiller inside a five-gallon paint strainer bag, and then putting the whole thing into the kettle. The bags from Home Depot have just the right mesh for this (I’ve found others to be too fine).

     

    With this setup, the pickup tube at the bottom of the kettle resides outside of the bag, but the egress tube on the whirlpool arm resides inside the bag. This allows me to capture all of the trub inside the bag during the whirlpool, so none of that material is transferred through to the fermenter.

     

    Really I was just looking for a way to use big late-hop additions without clogging the pump, and this worked well because the chiller doubles as a hop stand.

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